NCCAH Webinars

Knowledge translation and exchange involves a variety of methods aimed at exposing knowledge and making it understood. Knowledge translation is especially important in the context of Aboriginal health because there currently exists a gap between what we know about Aboriginal peoples’ health and what actions are being taken to improve health outcomes in this population. However, approaches that simply involve researchers getting the information out to knowledge users have been shown to be less effective than more creative approaches that shift the focus away from moving evidence towards solving problems and two-way exchange of information between researchers and knowledge users (Estey, 2008).

Webinars are increasingly being used as a tool for advancing learning because they enable participants to exchange information in a real-time, two-way format, allowing them to experience different levels of interaction online (Wang, & Hsu, 2008). Webinar tools offer numerous advantages for facilitating communication, including that they are affordable, they reduce travel expenses and travel time, they enable synchronous communication, they facilitate real-time multimedia demonstrations and multi-level interactions between audiences and presenters, and they provide an environment in which participants can archive content for personal review or for people who missed the real-time session (Ibid.). Further, with their focus on oral communication and the sharing of stories, perceptions and experiences, webinars are consistent with Indigenous knowledge systems and have greater potential to enable knowledge translation in an Aboriginal health context (Estey, 2008).

The NCCAH has also increasingly been using webinars as knowledge translation resources. From occasional webinars held in previous years, the NCCAH is now offering, alone and in partnership with other organizations, several webinars annually as part of its webinar series. To view these webinars, please follow the webinar resource links below. To join the #NCCAHWebinar conversation on Twitter follow us @NCCAH_CCNSA. To receive NCCAH Webinar announcements please subscribe to our mailing list.


Estey, E. (2008). An exploration of knowledge translation in Aboriginal health. Victoria, BC: Unpublished Master of Arts thesis, University of Victoria.

Wang, S.-K., & Hsu, H.-Y. (2008). Use of the webinar tool (Elluminate) to support training: The effects of webinar-learning implementation from student-trainers’ perspective. Journal of Interactive Online Learning, 7(3): 175-94.


Racism | Métis History | Cultural Safety | Family Violence

Anti-Aboriginal Racism in Canada: A Social Determinant of Health

GoToWebinar Registration GoToWebinar registration closed | October 23, 2015 at 10:00 am PST

Overview

The inaugural webinar in this series was a presentation by Dr. Charlotte Loppie from the University of Victoria on “Anti-Aboriginal Racism in Canada: A Social Determinant of Health.” The event was attended by over 240 people, including several international participants.

In this webinar, Dr. Charlotte Loppie explored anti-Aboriginal racism in Canada – how to understand it in historical context, how it affects individuals and communities, and what programs, policies and strategies exist to combat it. Dr. Loppie began by describing the construction of race as a form of social hierarchy, followed with an overview of expressions of racism as well as the impact of lived and structural racism on First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples in Canada. Finally, Dr. Loppie provided examples of efforts to address racism in Canada, including anti-racism interventions, anti-oppressive education and cultural competency, as well as anti-discrimination legislation.

Recommended Readings

Reading, C. (2013). Understanding Racism. Prince George, BC: National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health.

Loppie, S., Reading, C., and de Leeuw, S. (2014). Aboriginal Experiences with Racism and Its Impacts. Prince George, BC: National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health.

Reading, C. (2014). Policies, Programs and Strategies to Address Aboriginal Racism: A Canadian Perspective. Prince George, BC: National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health.

Webinar Resources

NCCAH Webinar Power Point show NCCAH Webinar PDF file NCCAH Webinar video on YouTube NCCAH Webinar audio on SoundCloud


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Knowing who you are: Métis history, identity and the Métis Nation today

GoToWebinar Registration GoToWebinar registration closed | January 27, 2016 at 10:00 am PST

Overview

On January 27, 2016, Métis historian Dr. Brenda Macdougall and Brodie Douglas, a representative from Métis Nation BC, presented a webinar entitled “Knowing who you are: Métis history, identity and the Métis Nation today”. This webinar explored the historical and contemporary identity and influence of Métis people in Canada. Dr. Macdougall overviewed the historical context in which the Métis Nation was born and highlighted the importance of knowing one’s identity and history to a strong and healthy nation, while Mr. Douglas provided thoughts on the contemporary challenges and advances of Métis people in Canada. The webinar was attended by 163 participants.

Webinar Resources

NCCAH Webinar Dr. Macdougall Power Point show NCCAH Webinar Dr. Macdougall PDF file Dr. Macdougall

NCCAH Webinar Brodie Douglas Power Point show NCCAH Webinar Brodie Douglas PDF file Mr. Douglas

NCCAH Webinar video on YouTube NCCAH Webinar audio on SoundCloud


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Cultural Safety for Indigenous Peoples: A Determinant of Health

GoToWebinar Registration GoToWebinar registration closed | February 17, 2016 at 10:00 am PST

Overview

A NCCAH webinar, co-hosted with Northern Health, was held on February 17, 2016 on “Cultural safety for Indigenous peoples: A determinant of health.” Dr. Sarah de Leeuw, Associate Professor in the Northern Medical Program, University of Northern British Columbia and a Research Associate for the National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health, explored how racism has manifested in the way health care services are provided to Indigenous peoples and is thus a barrier to their optimal health. Specifically, the presentation highlighted the ways in which Indigenous people have expressed their realities of experiencing racism, and discussed ways that healthcare professionals might engage with the arts and humanities in order to more deeply reflect on their thoughts about racism and Indigenous peoples. The webinar attracted great interest, with 366 participants in attendance.

Recommended Readings

de Leeuw, S. (January 2014). Telling Stories About Stories. The Canadian Family Physician Journal, 60(1). 5-7.

Elliot, C. and S. de Leeuw. (April 2009). Our Aboriginal Relations: When Family Doctors and Aboriginal Patients Meet. The Canadian Family Physician, Vol. 55. 443- 444.

Loppie, S. Reading, C. and de Leeuw, S. (2014). Aboriginal Experiences with Racism and its Impacts. Prince George, BC: National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health.

Webinar Resources

NCCAH Webinar Dr. Sarah de Leeuw Power Point show NCCAH Webinar Dr. Sarah de Leeuw PDF file NCCAH Webinar video on YouTube NCCAH Webinar audio on SoundCloud


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Re-thinking Family Violence: Centering Indigenous Knowledges

GoToWebinar Registration GoToWebinar registration closed | March 10, 2016 at 10:00 am PST

Overview

A NCCAH webinar, "Re-thinking Family Violence: Centering Indigenous Knowledges", was held on March 10, 2016 with presenters Drs. Sarah Hunt, Cindy Holmes, and Leanne Betasamosake Simpson. Drs. Hunt and Holmes began the webinar with a discussion of their research on how family violence and solutions to this violence in Indigenous communities have been framed in Canada over the past 20 years. Dr. Simpson then presented teachings through digital storytelling based in Anishinabek knowledge about families, healthy relationships, holistic views of health and the relational nature of wellness to encourage a rethinking of family violence in the context of Indigenous worldviews. The webinar ended with a series of questions for the 203 participants to take away for further thought and discussion in their own cultural and community contexts.

Recommended Readings

Leanne Simpson. (2011). Dancing on our Turtle’s Back: Stories of Nishnaabeg Re-Creation, Resurgence, and a New Emergence. Winnipeg: Arbiter Ring Publishing.

Greenwood, M., de Leeuw, S., Lindsay, N.L., & Reading, C. (2015). Determinants of Indigenous Peoples’ Health in Canada: Beyond the Social. Toronto: Canadian Scholars Press.

Baskin, Cindy. (2006). Systemic oppression, violence and healing in Aboriginal families and communities. In Cruel but Not Unusual: violence in Canadian Families. Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier UP.

Other Resources

Leanne Simpson's video: "Leaks Music Video"

Leanne Simpson's blog: "Honour the Apology"

Resources from the Native Youth Sexual Health Network

Sarah Hunt’s TedX Talk: “In her name: relationships as law”

Webinar Resources

NCCAH Webinar Power Point show NCCAH Webinar PDF file NCCAH Webinar video on YouTube NCCAH Webinar audio on SoundCloud


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